Weddings

Pose & Prose - advice from pros for your wedding day

Angela Forgeron asks the pros for tips to make your wedding memorable

Pose & Prose
Angela Forgeron asks the pros for tips to make your wedding memorable

 

Wedding album
George Pimentel has come a long way from working as a wedding photographer with his father to taking hot shots of everyone from JLo to Keira Knightley. He gives the lowdown on how to pose like a pro on your wedding day.

Guest relations
Last October, Dawn Bellini—who regularly works rooms at numerous professional events for her job as Hugo Boss Canada’s director of marketing and public relations—tied the knot. Here are her tips for making the most of mingling with your guests during the reception.

Speech patterns
Ben Mulroney, whose first “job” was emcee at his sister’s wedding, is host of CTV’s eTalk Daily and Canadian Idol. He suggests tips on how to ensure the speeches—from bride to groom and everyone in between—go smoothly.

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Wedding Album

The pro George Pimentel has come a long way from working as a wedding photographer with his father to taking hot shots of everyone from JLo to Keira Knightley. He gives the lowdown on how to pose like a pro on your wedding day.

Find your best side “Look in the mirror and discover your better side. Pay attention to your better eye and the way your hair flows. Mariah Carey will only let me photograph her on her right side.”

Spit it out “You’ll always see gum [in a photo] and you’ll never make a good smile while you’re chewing.”

Chin up “Raise your chin. You’ll look skinnier and you’ll avoid a double chin.”

Be natural “Don’t smile too hard. Blemishes will show, your eyes will end up squinting and squinting means wrinkles. Take a deep breath, be yourself and don’t overdo it with a clenched-teeth Julia Roberts smile.”

Counterbalance “Put more weight on one hip and point your toe out to the side. You’ll have an S curve and your figure will show better.”

Embrace the wind “Turn your face toward the wind. Work with it rather than letting it blow your hair around. You’ll have a sexy look.”

Blot it “If you feel hot and sweaty, you probably look hot and sweaty. Pat [your skin] down before having your photos taken—without ruining your makeup.”

Beware of nip slips “Cleavage is good; just be careful your breasts don’t pop out—the Tara Reid syndrome. It happens all the time, so look down once in a while to check.”

Consider candid “With [unposed] photos, the photographer tends to capture a quality you’ve never seen in yourself before. Shots of laughing and having fun capture the moment.”

Picking a photog “Look for somebody who has vision, a sense of humour and is artistic, but moreover somebody who gets along with everyone and who you’ll enjoy spending the whole day with.”

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Guest Relations

The pro Last October, Dawn Bellini—who regularly works rooms at numerous professional events for her job as Hugo Boss Canada’s director of marketing and public relations—tied the knot. Here are her tips for making the most of mingling with your guests during the reception.

Meet and greet “The receiving line is a necessary evil. It was the only way I got to see every single person.”

Go solo“Unlike couples who go around together to every table to say hello, my husband and I split the room. I said hello to all of my people and he said hello to all of his.”

Stay on schedule “Don’t spend more than two minutes chatting to each couple. Everyone is aware of your time constraints and they’re cool with it. You just have to be honest and say, ‘Gotta move.’ ”

Family first “See your family first to make sure they are comfortable and have drinks. Friends can take care of themselves, and they’ll get over it.”

Prioritize “Spend more time with your older family and your parents’ friends [early on]. They are not going to be kicking it up at 1 in the morning.”

Stay cool “Don’t over-plan or write up a timetable. Some of the best moments are the ones that happen organically. Just try to do your best.”

Don’t forget to eat “The waiters will follow you, filling your glass [with champagne], but they won’t follow with a plate of food.” Last words “Make sure to thank your guests for coming. You’ve invited them to be witness to your special day, so you obviously wanted them to be there.”

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Speech Patterns

The pro Ben Mulroney, whose first “job” was emcee at his sister’s wedding, is host of CTV’s eTalk Daily and Canadian Idol. He suggests tips on how to ensure the speeches—from bride to groom and everyone in between—go smoothly.

Find the right emcee “He who controls the microphone controls the pace and tone of the entire evening. The last thing you want is to get bogged down by speeches.”

Get planning “If it’s important to you, you’ll start, at the very least, thinking about a speech a couple of months in advance.”

Practice makes perfect “Practise with one person who you trust to give you their honest opinion.”

Read or recite “There’s nothing wrong with reading a speech, but prepare it so you can look up every now and then.”

Keep it clean “A wedding is not a roast. The bride wants to be treated like a princess and she wants this to be her fairy-tale wedding. There’s no place for insulting, drunken speeches in a fairy tale.”

Pace yourself “Slow down and change your diction for the important things, and speak more casually when you’re telling a joke.”

Short and sweet “Keep it to five minutes. This is not an Oscar acceptance speech.”

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article credits:
Photography, George Pimentel; editor, Tracy Picha