E! News Wouldn't Pay Catt Sadler as Much as Her Male Co-host, so She Dropped Her Mic

“How can we make it better for the next generation of girls if we do not stand for what is fair and just today?”

Ishani Nath
LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 13: Entertainment reporter Catt Sadler arrives at NBCUniversal's Press Junket at Beauty & Essex on November 13, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Amanda Edwards/WireImage)
(Photo: Amanda Edwards/WireImage)

If you don’t already know who Catt Sadler, get ready, because this woman deserves some recognition.

The E! News correspondent recently found out that she was getting paid approximately half of what her male co-host earned, and when the company refused to up her pay, she dropped her mic and left—literally.

Sadler released a statement on her website detailing why she was leaving E! and her “dream job”—a job where she had covered everything from the royal wedding to the Oscars. Spoiler alert, it was the gender pay gap. She said that when she started as the co-host of Daily Pop, one of E! Newss live two-hour daytime shows, earlier this year, an E! exec mentioned “that there was a massive disparity in pay between my similarly situated male co-host and myself.” Sadler later learned that her co-host was actually making nearly double her salary—and he had been for the past several years.

Armed with this information, Sadler attempted to renegotiate her salary at the end of her contract, but E! reportedly said no. “Not only only did [E!] refuse to pay me as much as my male counterpart, but they didn’t come close—nowhere close, not even remotely close,” she told People.

In a statement released to People, an E! spokesperson stated: “E! compensates employees fairly and appropriately based on their roles, regardless of gender. We appreciate Catt Sadler’s many contributions at E! News and wish her all the best following her decision to leave the network.”

But if this is all sounding far too familiar, it’s because, unfortunately, this story is not new. In Hollywood alone, numerous actresses, including Natalie Portman and Meryl Streep, have spoken out about the double standard when it comes to compensation.

“A few years ago, on one of my big-budget films, I found I was being paid 10 percent of what my male co-star was getting, and we were pretty even in status,” Amanda Seyfried told The Hollywood Reporter in 2015. “I think people think because I’m easy-going and game to do things, I’ll just take as little as they offer. But it’s not about how much you get, it’s about how fair it is.”

It’s 2017. We know that having a uterus DOES NOT mean that someone is less capable of doing a job. And yet, in Canada women, on average, still earn less than men in all fields, according to Statistics Canada. According to recent census data, women with a bachelor’s degree earned an average of $68,342 in 2016, but their male counterparts raked in more than $82,000 with the same level of education. Like, what the actual eff.

Continuing to pay women like Sadler less than their male peers sends a clear message that men are still literally valued more. And that is NOT OK.

Sadler wrote that leaving her job was not an easy decision, but given the information she was presented with, it was necessary.

“It’s scary. I am a single mother of two boys. The unknown can be terrifying, but it can also be the most beautiful gift,” Sadler wrote on her blog. “Countless brave women have come forward this year to speak their truth. Females refuse to remain silent on issues that matter most because without our voices, how will we invoke lasting change? How can we make it better for the next generation of girls if we do not stand for what is fair and just today?”

Sadler may no longer have a job, but she definitely earned our respect.

Related: 

Jessica Chastain on Gender Inequality at TIFF Red Carpet
It’s Equal Pay Day in Ontario, But How Equal Is Pay Across Canada?
A Director’s Take on Why We Need More Women Behind the Camera
Gal Gadot: “I Feel Like Every Woman Is Wonder Woman”

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