The Most Beautiful Beaches Across Canada

If you’re looking for some sun and sand for your summer vacay or weekend getaway, you don’t need to leave the country

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You don’t need your passport to feel the warm sand between your toes and the salt water in your hair. With summer fast approaching, we’ve rounded up the best beaches in Canada to spend a lazy day in the sun. Whether you’re looking for a secluded lakeside retreat in the depths of the forest or a surfer’s paradise with white sand and killer waves, we’ve got you covered.

Best Beaches in British Columbia

British Columbia - Best Beaches in Canada
Cox Bay in B.C. (Photo: Cox Bay Beach Resort)

Tribune Bay

The low-down: Located on the east side of Hornby Island, this rustic white sand beach is scattered with driftwood and punctuated by striking rock formations.
What to do: Dip your toes in the crystal-clear water or watch the sailboats while you lay in the sun. For a longer visit, park your car at the Tribune Bay Campsite and explore the rest of this lush island.
Peak season: July and August (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: Ostby Road, Hornby Island, env.gov.bc.ca

Cox Bay

The low-down: Powerful waves make this bay a fave with the local surfers.
What to do: Surfing, surf kayaking and stand-up paddle surfing. If it’s your first time catching a wave, you can rent equipment and take surfing lessons through the Tofino Surf Hub.
Peak season: June to August (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: Pacific Rim Highway, Tofino, gotofino.com

South Chesterman Beach

The low-down: With miles of sand and breathtaking sunsets, this laidback beach was named one of the best beaches in the world by The Guardian in 2016.
What to do: Surfing, surf kayaking, stand-up paddle surfing and wind surfing. If surfing isn’t your thing, you can take your pup on a seaside walk (it’s dog-friendly) or have a bonfire at sunset.
Peak season: June to August (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: 1358 Chesterman Beach Rd, Tofino, gotofino.com

Wreck Beach

The low-down: If you’re looking for a cheeky beach experience, head over to the largest nudist beach in North America—just 15 minutes from downtown Vancouver.
What to do: Go for a (skinny) dip in the ocean, check out the local food and clothing vendors, or toss around a volleyball—clothing optional.
Peak season: Mid-May to early September (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: NW Marine Dr, Pacific Spirit Regional Park, Vancouver, wreckbeach.org

Kalamalka Lake

The low-down: This lake is surrounded by the rolling hills of the Okanagan Valley, but the water’s bright turquoise colour is what truly makes this spot an Instagram-worthy beach destination.
What to do: Hike or bike through the Kalamalka Lookout Trail then cool down with a swim or rent a kayak for a scenic paddle.
Peak season: June to August (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: Kalamalka Lake Provincial Park, Vernon, tourismvernon.com

Best Beaches in Alberta

Alberta - Best Beaches in Canada
Herbert Lake in Alberta (Photo: Jeff Clow)

Herbert Lake

The low-down: With the jagged Rockies reflecting onto the glassy lake, you might have to pinch yourself when you take in this beautiful view. Try to get there by sunrise for the most breathtaking photos.
What to do: The summer weather brings warmer waters so enjoy a swim or head into higher altitudes to tour the Icefields in Banff National Park.
Peak season: Year-round (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No (just for 2017)
Find it: Columbia Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, banffnationalpark.com

Devonshire Beach

The low-down: Lesser Slave Lake’s shallow waters and natural shore make this spot a go-to for young families who like to fish.
What to do: Let your inner child run free at the beach’s annual sandcastle competition in July or climb the trail to the Marten Mountain viewpoint for a panoramic view of the provincial park and the lake.
Peak season: Mid-May to early September (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: Off of the Bicentennial Highway 88, Lesser Slave Lake Provincial Park, travelalberta.com

Sylvan Lake

The low-down: Halfway between Edmonton and Calgary, this beloved beach is a popular spot for city dwellers looking to get their lakeside fix.
What to do: Set up a picnic blanket in the shade for a cute and casual lunch by the shore or fly high above Sylvan Lake in a jetpack.
Peak season: June to early September (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: 4403 Lakeshore Dr, Sylvan Lake, albertaparks.ca

Kinosoo Beach

The low-down: This Alberta beach is located on Cold Lake and despite it’s chilly name, the water in the summer is anything but.
What to do: Enjoy the occasional live concert on the shore or rent a kayak, pedal boat or paddle board for an afternoon on the water.
Peak season: June to August (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: 1815-1 Avenue, Cold Lake, albertaparks.ca

Annette Lake

The low-down: Unwind at this secluded beach hidden in the mountains of Jasper National Park. Be sure to snap a photo and capture the turquoise waters and snowy peaks of the Rockies in the distance—no filter needed.
What to do: Take a walk in the wilderness on the 2.5 km trail along the lake, or if you’re feeling brave, plunge into the glacial water for an instant cool down on a hot day.
Peak season: June to August (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: Jasper National Park, pc.gc.ca

Best Beaches in Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan - Best Beaches in Canada
Good Spirit Lake in Saskatchewan (Photo: Tourism Saskatchewan)

Minowukaw Beach

The low-down: This woodland beach is located on the eastern part of Candle Lake Provincial Park—the shore is scattered with twigs and backed by a lush forest where you can truly be one with nature.
What to do: Cast a fishing line into the clear shallow lake water, play a round of golf at a resort nearby or pitch a tent at the campground and stay the night.
Peak season: Mid-May to early September (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: From $10 per day
Find it: Beach Ave, Candle Lake Provincial Park, tourismsaskatchewan.com

Echo Valley Beach

The low-down: The grassy slopes of the Echo Valley make a gorgeous backdrop to this breezy lakeside beach.
What to do: BYOB (burgers or booze) and have a cookout with the beach’s barbeques, or challenge your crew to a round of mini-golf after a day in the sand.
Peak season: Mid-May to early September (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: From $10 per day
Find it: Off of Highway 56 & 210, Fort Qu’Appelle, tourismsaskatchewan.com

Good Spirit Lake

The low-down: Known for its warm, calm waters and endless amenities, this beach has no shortage of wildlife—keep your eye out for furry friends like foxes and rabbits peaking out of the forest.
What to do: Take advantage of the built-in beach volleyball and tennis courts or discover the Trans Canada Trail by foot or by bike—you might be lucky and spot a deer or two.
Peak season: Year-round (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: From $10 per day
Find it: RR 2, Canora, tourismsaskatchewan.com

Big Buffalo Beach

The low-down: Off the beaten path, this quiet beach is a small slice of paradise with its soft white sand and ocean-like waves.
What to do: Wade in the waters of the Peter Pond Lake or enjoy the sounds of the lapping waves as you dive into your fave summer read.
Peak season: May to October (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: Off of Highway 155, Buffalo Narrows, tourismsaskatchewan.com

Best Beaches in Manitoba

Manitoba - Best Beaches in Canada
Grand Beach in Manitoba (Photo: Courtesy of AJ Batac)

Grand Beach

The low-down: One of Manitoba’s most popular beaches, this busy spot is a sea of colourful beach umbrellas and towels during the peak season.
What to do: Walk along the boardwalk, which is marked with signs and archival photos, for a quick history lesson of the area, or go berry picking in the provincial park—Saskatoons, chokecherries and blueberries grow in the summer.
Peak season: June to August (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: From $5 per day
Find it: 79 1st St, Grand Beach Provincial Park, Grand Marais, gov.mb.ca

Patricia Beach

The low-down: This spot is a quieter alternative to the busier beaches in the northern region of the province—the white sand and secluded atmosphere makes you feel like you’re on a tropical island.
What to do: Go bird watching at the lagoon, take a lakeside nap under the trees that line the shore, or if you want to explore the area a bit further, walk north to Beaconia Beach where clothing is optional.
Peak season: June to August (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: From $5 per day
Find it: Off of Provincial Rd 319, Patricia Beach Provincial Park, Beaconia, gov.mb.ca

Winnipeg Beach

The low-down: Just 45 minutes north of Winnipeg, this sparkling lake is steps away from the town’s shops, restos, golf courses and picturesque marina—you’ll never run out of things to do in this charming beach town.
What to do: July is the ideal time to visit—first, check out the local talent every weekend on the beach’s bandstand or visit at the end of the month for the annual Boardwalk Days summer festival when the town is taken over by rides, vendors, a craft market and a huge parade.
Peak season: July to September (lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: Main Street, Winnipeg Beach, winnipegbeach.ca

Falcon Lake

The low-down: This beach is located on the north side of Whiteshell Provincial Park—an area rich with rushing streams, lush boreal forest and beautiful hiking trails.
What to do: Sit on the dock and dip your toes in the fresh water while you breathe in the wilderness air, or head over to the Falcon Beach Ranch and go horseback riding through the park.
Peak season: June to August (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: Off of Hwy 1, Whiteshell Provincial Park, Eastern Manitoba, gov.mb.ca

Clearwater Lake

The low-down: This crystal-clear turquoise lake truly lives up to its name—from the surface, you can see 35 feet deep into the water.
What to do: Explore by boat and look for the trout, pike and whitefish that live in the lake, or visit in August for the Opaskwayak Indian Days—a celebration of the local Cree Nation heritage.
Peak season: June to August (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: From $5 per day
Find it: Off of Hwy 287, Clearwater Lake Provincial Park, The Pas, gov.mb.ca

Best Beaches in Ontario

Ontario - Best Beaches in Canada
Hanlan’s Point in Ontario (Photo: Courtesy Joseph Morris)

Sandbanks Dunes Beach

The low-down: Living up to its name, this family-friendly beach on West Lake is surrounded by eight kilomentres of rolling sand dunes.
What to do: Relax under a beach umbrella on a sandy slope, pack a picnic lunch or walk the hilly trails in the dunes—trust us, you’ll feel the burn.
Peak season: Late-April to early October (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: Country Rd 12, Picton, ontarioparks.com

Indian Head Cove Beach

The low-down: The beach’s rocky coastline and the blue-green water of the Bruce Peninsula make this spot a truly rustic Canadian treasure.
What to do: For the adrenaline junkie, go cliff jumping off The Grotto or climb through the caves along the shoreline, and for the scuba enthusiast, discover over 20 shipwrecks hidden beneath the Peninsula.
Peak season: July and August (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: Cyprus Lake Rd, Tobermory, tobermory.com

Wasaga Beach

The low-down: With 14 km of Georgian Bay’s warm shallow waters, this popular summer spot is the longest freshwater beach in the world.
What to do: After a refreshing swim, towel off and head over to the boardwalk where there is no shortage of ice cream, nautical knick knacks and cold beer. If you want to tackle the waves, rent a boat or canoe and set sail.
Peak season: April to October (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: 11 22nd St N, Wasaga Beach, wasagabeach.com

Pinery Beach

The low-down: Backed by acres of forest, this narrow beach is a quaint and quiet spot on the shores of Lake Huron, plus it’s dog friendly, so you let your pup run free.
What to do: Rent a canoe, kayak, paddle boat or hydro bike and hit the water, or reconnect with nature on one of the provincial park’s ten hiking trails.
Peak season: Year-round (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: From $11 per day
Find it: 9526 Lakeshore Rd, Grand Bend, ontarioparks.com

Best Beaches in Quebec

Quebec - Best Beaches in Canada
Lac Philippe in Quebec (Photo: Julia Unchura)

Havre-Aubert Beach

The low-down: One of the most famous beaches on Île de Havre Aubert, this spot has stretches of golden sand perfect for a seaside stroll. Plus it’s not far from the heart of the quaint Acadian town that is dotted with lighthouses and jewel-coloured buildings.
What to do: Walk to the Bout de Banc point to catch a glimpse of the rolling hills on Entry Island or plan a trip during the famous Concors de Châteaux de Sable des Îles (sand castle building competition) from August 11–13, 2017.
Peak season: June to August (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: Off of Chemin du Sable, Île de Havre Aubert, tourismeilesdelamadeleine.com

Tessier Beach

The low-down: With a designated swimming area and plenty of shaded spots, this beach on the Lac de Sables is a fave with the locals.
What to do: Spend an afternoon by the shore—have a boozy BBQ lunch (alcohol is allowed), play a game of beach volleyball and wade in the cool lake water.
Peak season: Mid-June to mid-September (lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: From $10 per day
Find it: 35 Rue Major, Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts, laurentides.com

Penouille Beach

The low-down: This sandy beach is located near the Fort Peninsula, a fortification that was built in WWII.
What to do: Try your hand at wind surfing, go whale watching through the waters of the Gaspé Bay and the Gulf of St. Lawrence or hike to the Cap Bon Ami for a stunning view.
Peak season: June to August (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No (just for 2017)
Find it: Forillon National Park, Gaspé, pc.gc.ca

Lac Philippe

The low-down: Less than an hour outside of Gatineau, this lake is a popular spot for camping, so rent a cabin or pitch a tent and discover the rest of Gatineau Park.
What to do: Rent a kayak, canoe or paddle boat or venture through Lusk Cave, a natural marble cave— about a 5 km hike from Lac Philippe.
Peak season: May to September (lifeguard on duty in the summer as of June 16, 2017)
Entry fees: From $11 per day, $5 per day after 3 p.m.
Find it: Gatineau Park, Gatineau, ncc-ccn.gc.ca

Best Beaches in Newfoundland & Labrador

Newfoundland & Labrador - Best Beaches in Canada
Shallow Bay Beach in Newfoundland (Photo: Courtesy Newfoundland and Labrador Tourism)

Salmon Cove Sands

The low-down: The rugged cliffs jetting out from the ocean on this heart-shaped beach are truly a spectacular sight to see. With its dark grey sand and cool Atlantic ocean, you have to add it to your summer bucket list if you’re in the area.
What to do: Get a birds-eye-view of the ocean and surrounding cliffs on the lookout point (you might even spot a whale) or take part in the annual Beach Ultimate Frisbee Tournament on July 8, 2017.
Peak season: June to September (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: From $7 per day
Find it: 107 Pennys Rd, Salmon Cove, newfoundloundandlabrador.com

Shallow Bay Beach

The low-down: Breathe in the salty air of this pebbly beach located on the northwest side of the island.
What to do: Walk along the shore and search for seashells and sand dollars hidden in the sand or plan a trip in the fall when hundreds of migrating shorebirds gather at high tide.
Peak season: June to September (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No (just for 2017)
Find it: Route 430, Cow Head, Gros Morne National Park, newfoundlandandlabrador.com

Middle Cove Beach

The low-down: From the snowcapped cliffs in the winter to the grassy hills and warm blue water in the summer, this beach is beautiful all year round—plus it’s just a 20-minute drive from St. John’s.
What to do: At sunset, warm up by a campfire on the rocky shore or try your hand at capelin fishing—hundreds of little silver fish roll up on the Newfoundland shores in the summer.
Peak season: Year-round (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: Off of Route 30, Middle Cove, Logy Bay newfoundlandandlabrador.com

Deer Lake Beach

The low-down: With stretches of flat golden-brown sand, this hidden gem is ideal for spreading a beach towel, slathering on some SPF and soaking up the summer sun.
What to do: Pack some champagne and have a chic dinner on one of the many picnic tables or channel your zen with sunset yoga on the beach—Carma Yoga in Deer Lake offers seaside sessions.
Peak season: June to October (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: 85-131 Nicholsville Rd, Deer Lake, newfoundlandandlabrador.com

Bottle Cove Beach

The low-down: With the waves crashing onto the seaside cliffs, this beach is the epitome of the east coast’s rugged beauty—the cove is located in the charming fishing town of Lark Harbour.
What to do: Hike up the 2.5 km Bottle Cove Hiking Trail and take in the stunning view of the Gulf of St. Lawrence or stop at a local restaurant in town for the catch of the day.
Peak season: Year-round (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: Off of Route 450, Lark Harbour, newfoundlandandlabrador.com

Best Beaches in New Brunswick

New Brunswick - Best Beaches in Canada
Parlee Beach in New Brunswick (Photo: Jamie McCaffrey)

Hopewell Rocks

The low-down: This beach is known for its 40- to 70-ft tall “flowerpot” rocks that jet out along the sand, and it’s only 30 minutes outside of downtown Moncton.
What to do: When the tide is low, walk along the rocky ocean floor and when the tide is high, hop in a kayak or canoe and travel in-between the rock formations for a truly scenic paddle.
Peak season: Mid-May to mid-October (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: From $10 a person, per day
Find it: 131 Discovery Rd, Hopewell Cape, thehopewellrocks.ca

Parlee Beach

The low-down: Home to the warmest salt water in Canada, this beach in Pointe-du-Chêne is a popular spot during the peak season—if you’re looking for a spot with lots of action, this beach is for you.
What to do: Check out the beach volleyball competitions in June and August or head over to the beach restaurant for cocktails and killer seafood after a day in the sun.
Peak season: June to August (lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: From $13 per day
Find it: 45 Parlee Beach Rd, Pointe-du-Chêne, tourismnewbrunswick.ca

New River Beach

The low-down: This family-friendly beach on the Bay of Fundy has a beautiful view of the coastal islands and fishing boats in the distance.
What to do: Search for crabs and starfish in the tidal pools along the shore, or go camping at the provincial park and wake up to the sound of the ocean.
Peak season: Mid-May to mid-October (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: From $10 per day
Find it: 78 New River Beach Rd, New River Beach, tourismnewbrunswick.ca

La Dune de Bouctouche

The low-down: This conservation area beach has a winding footbridge over the sand dunes for a picturesque and rustic walk to the water.
What to do: Take a guided tour at the Irving Eco-Centre and learn about the preservation of the dunes and salt marshes along the coastline.
Peak season: Late-May to early October (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: 1932 Route 475, Saint-Édouard-de-Kent, tourismnewbrunswick.ca

Dominion Park Beach

The low-down: Just 15 minutes from the city centre, this lush beach on Randolph Island is perfect for a seaside escape from urban life.
What to do: Let your dog splash in the river while you relax in a beach chair, crack open a good book and enjoy some peace and quiet.
Peak season: Mid-June to early September (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: 730 Dominion Park Rd, Saint John, @DominionPark

Best Beaches in Prince Edward Island

Prince Edward Island - Best Beaches in Canada
Cedar Dunes Beach in P.E.I. (Photo: Tourism PEI)

Greenwich Beach

The low-down: Skip the well-known beaches packed with tourists and head over to this local gem, with amenities powered solely by wind and solar energy. Also, watch out for little sandpipers scurrying around your feet on the golden sand.
What to do: Take a scenic stroll on the boardwalk of the Greenwich Dunes Trail which cuts through grassy marshes, travels over pools of water and leads you to the final destination: the sand and the sea.
Peak season: Mid-May to late September (lifeguard on duty June to September)
Entry fees: No (just for 2017)
Find it: 59 Wild Rose Rd, Off of Route 313, welcomepei.com

Cedar Dunes Beach

The low-down: The black and white West Point Lighthouse is a unique marker for this low-key beach. If all you want to hear is the sound of waves crashing on the shore, this quiet spot will be your go-to.
What to do: Step inside the tallest lighthouse in PEI, which doubles as a museum and an inn, or sink your teeth into a fresh lobster roll at the Catch Kitchen + Bar.
Peak season: June to August (lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: 265 Cedar Dunes Park Rd, O’Leary, tourismpei.com

Basin Head Beach

The low-down: The beach’s singing sands are a must-see (and hear). Swish your toes through the sand and listen closely to the squeaking sound, which is caused by the high amounts of silica and quartz.
What to do: Take part in the popular bridge jumping into The Run, cool down at The Scoops with an ice cream and a summer bevvie, or head over to the Fisheries Museum for a historical lesson of the town’s fishing industry (opening in June).
Peak season: Late June to early September (lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: 318 Basin Head Rd, Souris, basinhead.com

Cavendish Beach

The low-down: With the soft sand, red rocky shores and grassy dunes, this beach is the epitome of PEI’s seaside beauty. This is a popular destination for tourists during the summer, so make sure to get there early to claim a spot along the sandy shore.
What to do: Get your country music fix at the Cavendish Beach Festival from July 7–9, 2017—catch Little Big Town and Zac Brown Band on the main stage.
Peak season: July to September (lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No (just for 2017)
Find it: 590 Graham’s Lane, Cavendish, cavendishbeachpei.com

Cabot Beach

The low-down: Terracotta red sand, jagged cliffs and evergreen trees line the waters of the Malpeque Bay. Your pooch will love the tidal pools and sandbanks that emerge at low tide on this dog-friendly beach.
What to do: Paddle along the coast on a colourful kayak and or go for a road trip to the town of Kensington, just a 15-minute drive from the beach where you can explore the local shops and restos.
Peak season: Late June to early September (lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: 449 King St, Rte 20, Malpeque, tourismpei.com

Best Beaches in Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia - Best Beaches in Canada
Medford Beach in Nova Scotia (Photo: Mary E. Hill)

Ingonish Beach

The low-down: Located on the northeast coast of Cape Breton Island, the sandy shores of this beach are lined with a bed of grey and pastel rocks.
What to do: Take a dip in the salty waters of the Atlantic Ocean then hop in the freshwater lake, all in one beach trip. Travel along the coast by boat in search of the local marine life—the summer is perf for whale watching.
Peak season: Mid-July to late September (lifeguard on duty July and August)
Entry fees: No (just for 2017)
Find it: Cabot Trail, Ingonish, Cape Breton Island, ingonish.com

Lawrencetown Beach

The low-down: This beach is the perfect destination if you’re looking to escape the fast-paced Haligonian life—it’s only a short 25-minute drive from downtown.
What to do: Ditch your satchel for a surfboard as soon as your feet hit the sand—these Atlantic waters are ideal for both amateur and professional surfers, plus surfing lessons are available if you need them.
Peak season: July and August (lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: 4348 NS-207, East Lawrencetown, lawrencetownbeach.com

Medford Beach

The low-down: The beach’s brick-red sand and rugged sandstone formations make this an under-the-radar Nova Scotia gem.
What to do: At low tide, walk along the sand and explore the giant formations that have been carved by some of the highest tides in the world.
Peak season: Year-round (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: Medford Beach Rd, Canning, valleytourism.ca

Crystal Crescent Beach

The low-down: With a boardwalk tucked in-between rolling sand dunes, this beach is right out of a Nicholas Sparks’ romantic seaside movie.
What to do: Attached to a provincial park which offers a gorgeous 10 km trail to Pennant Point, this beach has it all: swimming, fishing and hiking.
Peak season: Mid-May to early October (no lifeguard on duty)
Entry fees: No
Find it: 223 Sambro Creek Road, Sambro Creek, parks.novascotia.ca

Mavillette Beach

The low-down: This scenic beach, located in the Yarmouth and Acadian Shores region, is surrounded by a grassy shoreline. At low tide, over a kilometre of sand flats appear for a breathtaking walk along the shore.
What to do: Rent a kayak, go birdwatching or grab a cone from an old boat turned ice cream parlour.
Peak season: Mid-May to early October (lifeguard on duty July and August)
Entry fees: No
Find it: 295-395 John Doucette Rd, Mavillette, parks.novascotia.ca

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