On the Runway

NADA AND JOEFFER CAOC

Nada Spring/Summer ’11; Photo by Phil Birnbaum

Nada Spring/Summer ’11; Photo by Phil Birnbaum

Joeffer Caoc Spring/Summer ’11; Photo by Phil Birnbaum

Joeffer Caoc Spring/Summer ’11; Photo by Phil Birnbaum

Joeffer Caoc Spring/Summer ’11; Photo by Phil Birnbaum

Nada Spring/Summer ’11; Photo by Phil Birnbaum

For Joeffer Caoc and Nada Shepherd’s combined show last night, the trend towards taking the fashion pack out of their bubble continued. While a dark, freezer-frigid converted brick factory in the basin of a ravine was an unusual choice for their respective Spring collections, it was nonetheless inspired. This heightened sense of mystery, however, also extended to the lack of proper distinction between the two collections. As the show began without any indication as to which designer was presenting, heads were scratched trying to identify if it was NADA or Joeffer who was responsible for the mixed-animal print and flamingo-pink satin tops paired with herringbone menswear bottoms. Not the best way to begin. Thankfully, a deft, noir lace and silk-backed shirtdress and back-zip circle skirt redeemed the show, care of Joeffer. They were lovely statements for those who don’t switch into light-hued airy fare come the warmer months. An abstracted aquatic print minidress nodded to the suft-culture trend without being to literal. But when languid striped separates, especially some winning neo-nautical long dresses appeared, their effortless was pure Joeffer. Long champagne gowns wafted down the runway, finishing up his set. A nod to the seventies without a whiff of retro. Meanwhile, NADA’s turn at the catwalk started with obscured almost-plaid printed summer suits. The best piece was an oversize botton-up, worn casually over a pair of slouchy-slim pants. A standout dove gray sheer-back dress turned heads and continued the evening’s long and lean theme. At times, some dresses appeared too pencil-thin. In an effort to get an unbelievably slender silhouette, the consideration of walking was second fiddle. Regardless, they looked great – especially in that interesting Lego-like blue (royal blue has become a bit of a “pop of colour” cliché anyway) so you can hardly blame Mrs. Shepherd for her restrictive-chic ways. That is, until you try to get in and out of your chauffeured Audi, the night’s omnipresent sponsor.

Watch the Spring ’11 videos here!