On the Runway

Amanda Lee Kew and Duy Spring/Summer '11

Amanda Lee Kew Spring/Summer ’11; Photo by George Pimentel

Amanda Lee Kew Spring/Summer ’11; Photo by George Pimentel

Amanda Lee Kew Spring/Summer ’11; Photo by George Pimentel

DUY Spring/Summer ’11; Photo by George Pimentel

DUY Spring/Summer ’11; Photo by George Pimentel

DUY Spring/Summer ’11; Photo by George Pimentel

New to the LG Fashion Week lineup, Ryerson graduate Amanda Lee Kew and Montreal’s Duy (formerly of Pink Tartan) both delivered promising collections. Lee Kew’s debut look was a micro-mini fringe skirt that came up a bit too short. Next were crisp shifts in shades of tan. Craft-paper-look coated cottons and linens were both crisp and relaxed, but the mini-bubble treatment on sculpted shoulders appeared awkward. Simpler details, such as naïve self-belts let Lee Kew’s alluring fabrics and flattering nipped silhouettes shine. A long taupe tank dress with Raquel Allegra-style (and Thomas, last season) threadbare shreaded sides would appeal to the Alexander Wang or Vanessa Bruno customer I suspect Lee Kew is vying to charm.  Speaking of, the standout look, a milky tea layered long-sheer-sleeve dress with platinum beaded fringe won us over. Her blue-lipped bow (to match her models) also beguiled.

Duy’s collection explored the theme of The English Patient. Smartly, there were no literal translations of the film’s costumes, but rather, a spirit similar to the film’s African safari-scape. Uptown hostess caftans, here in lemon meringue yellow and a drapey trench coat worn haughtily as a dress were the strongest statements. They quietly echoed the film’s mise-en-scène. A silver tuxedo jacket with full white cropped pants and feather-peplum frock veered from the theme but were pretty, if a bit flippant. A bubblemint pink skin-tight short suit really took away from the elegance Duy had established. Just in time, champagne silk open-flap evening coats and a cocoon-back pleated LBD were sincerely stellar. In short – actually, in long – when the designer sticks to elongated silhouettes with wafting-cloth gestures, he excels.