Beauty

Personal Best


Personal Best

Nike Human Race 10k


 
Nike Human Race 10k

5,143,572: the number of kilometres run in Vancouver’s Nike Human Race 10k on Sunday, August 31, 2008.

Of which 10k were run by me (in 56:25—a personal best!). And besides being a personally thrilling day thanks to logging a PB, the day was exciting for runners around the world. Vancouver’s race was just part of the very first global race, which included 24 other cities, such as Los Angeles (where Kanye West performed in the post-race festivities), Melbourne, Seoul and Madrid (the country that clocked the fastest average speed of 56:34; compared to Van City’s average pace of 58:21).

In Vancouver, we were blessed with great running weather—a high of about 18 during the day that cooled a little by the time we ran at 7 p.m. The route was gorgeous, looping around the Seawall and over two bridges, Burrard St. and Cambie St.—a scenic route that had me desperately wishing I could take some pictures along the route (that is, desperately wishing, but not hard enough to extend my race time!).

Tons of spectators were along the route cheering the sea of runners dressed in red T-shirts—they provided some much needed encouragement when I started to fade somewhere around the 8 km mark.

After the race, a few Olympians (including Simon Whitfield and Gary Reed) presented awards to the race winners: Simon Bairu was the first man to cross the finish line at 29:55 and Karen Warrendorf, the first woman, with a time of 39:39.

And as the night grew dark, runners took a dip in a hot tub, refueled and rehydrated, all to the beats of Nova Scotia’s The Trews and Vancouver’s Theory of a Deadman. And I don’t know if it’s thanks to the excitement of the race, or if I actually achieved a runner’s high for the very first time, but good energy of some sort has kept me going for a week.

Although the Human Race 10k has been billed as a one-time event, I’m keeping my fingers crossed that Nike will make this an annual one. Sign me up—I’ve got a new personal best to set.