Beauty

Beauty - Shock Treatments


Shock treatments
Adriana Ermter solves five of your beauty traumas
 

1. Bleached Skin

 

2. Bad Bikini Wax

 

3. Hair Chemical Disaster

 

4. Facial Fracas

 

5. Arch Attack

1. Bleached Skin

The ugly story: Self-conscious about her moustache, Jenny* attempted DIY hair bleach. “I must have mixed the solution incorrectly or left it on too long because my skin started to tingle,” says the 30-year-old. When she wiped the bleach off, the entire area above her upper lip was two shades paler than the rest of her face. “I looked like I had a permanent milk moustache.”
Rescue remedy: First, know that good-quality products only bleach the hair – not the skin, says Wendy Lisogar-Cocchia, owner of the Absolute spa group in Vancouver. Ask friends or drugstore beauticians for product referrals. If you find yourself two-toned, Lisogar-Cocchia recommends using a mineral-based foundation made for sensitive skin to add colour to the bleached area. And be thankful – bleached skin generally fades in 24–72 hours.
FLARE’s pick: Physicians Formula Mineral Wear Talc-Free Mineral Foundation, 30 mL, $17.

Return to Shock Treatments main page

next page >

2. Bad Bikini Wax

treatments The ugly story: Headed for a beach vacation with her fiancé, Heather Feeney decided to save money and give herself a bikini wax. “It was only the second time I’d ever done it and I’m definitely not as good as the lady at the spa,” she admits. One home hot-wax kit and finishing touches with the tweezers later, Feeney’s bikini area was red, painful and raw. “I had ripped the top layer of my skin off. It turned into thick brown lines that looked like tea stains and took more than a week to heal.”
Rescue remedy: Wax rips and peels skin when too hot and incorrectly applied and removed. “When in doubt, don’t do it at home. We see more corrections than you could guess,” says Lisogar-Cocchia. Renowned for its calming, anti-inflammatory properties, pure essential lavender oil “is the true warrior healer,” says Lisogar-Cocchia. It should be used on the afflicted area once a day. For optimum coverage, camouflage bruising and dark markings with healing mineral-based makeup.
FLARE’s picks: Jane Iredale Disappear, 15 g, $33, a camouflage cream with antioxidant green-tea extract, and Aveda Singular Notes Lavender Oil, 30 mL, $22.

Return to Shock Treatments main page

next page >

3. Hair Chemical Disaster

The ugly story: “I was going on a date, but my hair was as flat as a pancake, so I wanted to get a loose-curl perm,” says Karen*. At the salon, Karen explained to the hairstylist what she wanted. Mid-process, she smelled something burning. It was her hair. “My hair literally fell off the rollers like a dried-up, crumpled rat’s nest. If you touched it, you would have got a sliver.” Left with a one-inch buzz cut, Karen cancelled her date. True story.
Rescue remedy: Your only choice is to cut your hair to its healthiest length and start over. Trim your stressed tresses every six weeks and splurge on professional salon products (shampoo, conditioner and a deep-conditioning masque) formulated for chemically treated hair to restore, nourish and protect your do back into shape.
FLARE’s picks: Kérastase Resistance Bain de Force Shampoo, 250 mL, $28, and Kérastase Resistance Ciment Anti-Usure Conditioner, 200 mL, $37. Before your next chemical service (perm, highlights or colour), Susan Hayward, head colourist at Taz Hair Co., in Toronto and ambassador technical consultant for L’Oréal Professionnel, advises asking your stylist if your hair is healthy enough to survive a chemical process. “Not all hairdressers are created equal, though, so find one you trust to help you through your crisis,” she says.

Return to Shock Treatments main page

next page >

4. Facial Fracas

The ugly story: “My mom and I were enjoying a spa day and, during my facial, my face started burning and itching when the esthetician put on the first cream. I told her what was happening. She said it was my pores opening up,” says TV personality and actor Stéphanie Broschart. Hives, swelling, itchiness and red skin soon erupted, forcing Broschart off the small screen for days. “I was way too scary-looking. My colleagues nicknamed me ‘gator face.’ ”
Rescue remedy: Skin irritation can be avoided by choosing a reputable esthetician (recommended through friends, family and beauty magazines). Alert them to any perfume or product allergies and/or skin conditions such as rosacea or eczema prior to the treatment. When in doubt, avoid abrasive alphahydroxy peels and granular exfoliants. Instead, choose a facial that boasts cooling and soothing benefits made for sensitive-prone skin. Products ideal for touchy skin contain ingredients such as honey, cucumber, licorice, rose, bioflavonoids (red berry plants), or willow herb essential extracts. Once the damage has been done, however, dermatologist Dr. Diane Berson, a consultant for Kao Brands in New York City, says the first step toward healing is to apply cool compresses of milk and water, followed by a soothing aloe-based moisturizer mixed with hydrocortisone (a steroid) cream to decrease inflammation. “Aspirin or ibuprofen can also help alleviate discomfort and inflammation,” says Dr. Berson. Follow up daily with facial products containing licochalcone (licorice extract), green tea or soy to help reduce redness. If symptoms do not disappear in 2–3 days, make an appointment to see your dermatologist.
FLARE’s pick: Jurlique Herbal Recovery Gel, 30 mL, $87.

Return to Shock Treatments main page

next page >

5. Arch Attack

The ugly story: In a hurry and with eyebrows in an overgrown state of emergency, Lily* asked the esthetician performing her facial to wax her arches as well. “Normally, I get threading done, so when the waxing became painful, I just thought, Oh, this is what waxing must feel like,” says Lily. But moments later, when her esthetician uttered, “Uh-oh,” Lily knew she was in trouble. “She’d ripped a layer of skin off my eyebrows. The next day, I had scabs all over.”
Rescue remedy: Because many women use facial products containing active ingredients such as retinol or glycolic acid, which can make skin sensitive to waxing, even the best esthetician can take off a layer of skin by accident. That said, a damaged eyebrow area can be avoided with a light dusting of powder prior to waxing, while pure aloe vera, vitamin E and essential lavender oil heal and minimize potential scarring.

Return to Shock Treatments main page