Piers Morgan Is Policing Women’s Bodies Again—and Emily Ratajkowski Isn’t Having It

Along with the Love magazine video that offended Morgan so deeply, Ratajkowski wrote a statement about her views on feminism, saying, “The way I dress, act, flirt, dance, have sex—those are my decisions and they shouldn’t be impacted by men”

  0
Emily Ratajkowski on the red carpet in a white shirt and long earrings

(Photo: Getty Images)

When will Piers Morgan stop? The TV personality is up to his old tricks, offering up commentary about how women should and should not present their bodies and sexuality, name-calling (his latest misogynist nickname bequeathed to model Emily Ratajkowski? “Global bimbo.” Nice.) and determining—because he’s such an expert—what makes a “good feminist.” Spoiler alert: as in many cases in the past (see: when he mansplained his take on feminism with regards to the Women’s March; when he said Jennifer Aniston was not entitled to an opinion on female objectification because she had appeared on magazine covers; and when he previously dragged Ratajkowski for a past nude photo shoot), Morgan is pretty much full of shit.

On December 5, Morgan took to his Twitter account to insult the model and actress for a recent spaghetti-themed photo and video shoot she did for Love magazine’s famous advent calendar series, mocking her for “promoting feminism” and following it up with one arrogant misogynist comment after another.

The broadcaster also blasted Ratajkowski on his TV show, Good Morning Britain, telling her to “get some clothes on and get a proper job.” His co-host Susanna Reid also got in on the action: “Piers has got a personal vendetta against her. She likes to think taking her clothes off is promoting feminism.” Cute. Always awesome to see women supporting women in 2017.

He also told viewers: “She’s posted something on Instagram about how what we are watching now is unbelievably empowering to feminists” and “I don’t know quite what she is. She’s a global bimbo.”

Ratajkowski responded to his comments on Twitter, calling his response “classic sexism.” She wrote: “Lol never said my love video was a feminist statement. But now it’s worth saying that telling women what to do with their bodies & sexuality is actually just classic sexism. I can have opinions about feminism & also do sexy photo shoots k thanks.”

Preach, @emrata. Why is the notion that women can “have opinions about feminism and also do sexy photo shoots”—or wear revealing clothing or sleep with whomever they please—just so difficult for some people to wrap their heads around?

Along with a teaser of the spaghetti video, Love magazine published a statement on feminism written by Ratajkowski. “To me, female sexuality and sexiness, no matter how conditioned it may be by a patriarchal ideal, can be incredibly empowering for a woman if she feels it is empowering to her. The way I dress, act, flirt, dance, have sex—those are my decisions and they shouldn’t be impacted by men. Being sexy is fun and I like it. I should never have to apologize for that. My life is on my terms and if I feel like putting on sexy underwear, it’s for me. Personal choice is the core ideal in my concept of feminism,” she wrote.

She went on to write about the aftermath of the Harvey Weinstein revelations. “In the wake of the Harvey fallout and women coming forward with incredible amounts of sexual harassment cases, I have been so disappointed to hear women talk about ‘modesty’ and ‘our responsibility’ as if we need to, yet again, adjust to make it ‘easier’ for the rest of the world. I’m tired of having to consider how I might be perceived by men if I wear the short skirt or post a sexy Instagram. I want to do what I want to do.”

She continued: “Feminism isn’t about adjusting, it’s about freedom and choice…. I’ve had men comment on sexy images of me online and say ‘this is empowering to you? Ha! I just masturbated to it so hope you feel good about yourself!’ I guess that’s the way people can react, which ironically, ultimately serves my point. I don’t care about your reaction or what you do with my expression of self. In fact, it has nothing to do with you at all and that’s the point—which is why it feels good.

“Ultimately, if a woman wants to wear a burka or nothing at all, it’s great if it’s what she wants and feels good about,” Ratajkowski concluded.

On the 3rd day of Christmas my true #LOVEADVENT gave to me @emrata’s amazing polemic on female empowerment. “To me, female sexuality and sexiness, no matter how conditioned it may be by a patriarchal ideal, can be incredibly empowering for a woman if she feels it is empowering to her. The way I dress, act, flirt, dance, have sex – those are my decisions and they shouldn’t be impacted by men. Being sexy is fun and I like it. I should never have to apologize for that. My life is on my terms and if I feel like putting on sexy underwear, it’s for me. Personal choice is the core ideal in my concept of feminism. Katie directed us to say ‘Stay Strong’ at the end of each video and I think it’s a message from one woman to another. You’re watching a video of a girl grinding in lingerie or whatever else and she is looking into the camera at the end saying, ‘you do you, however YOU want to, fuck the rest’. In the wake of the Harvey fallout and women coming forward with incredible amounts of sexual harassment cases, I have been so disappointed to hear women talk about “modesty” and “our responsibility” as if we need to, yet again, adjust to make it “easier” for the rest of the world. I’m tired of having to consider how I might be perceived by men if I wear the short skirt or post a sexy Instagram. I want to do what I want to do. Feminism isn’t about adjusting, it’s about freedom and choice. Do you think viewers will understand that, given the current wider conversation about the sexual objectification of women? why or why not? What are the risks? This is something I’ve battled with personally and publicly. I’ve had men comment on sexy images of me online and say “this is empowering to you? Ha! I just masturbated to it so hope you feel good about yourself!” I guess that’s the way people can react, which ironically, ultimately serves my point. I don’t care about your reaction or what you do with my expression of self. In fact, it has nothing to do with you at all and that’s the point-which is why it feels good. Ultimately, if a woman wants to wear a burka or nothing at all, it’s great if it’s what she wants and feels good about.”#STAYSTRONG Link in bio to full film

A post shared by LOVE MAGAZINE (@thelovemagazine) on

To echo the words that Ratajkowski herself has pinned to her Twitter page, a refresher to Morgan, Reid and everyone else who thinks it’s their place to police women’s bodies and qualify what kind of feminists they are: “Women choosing when and how they want to share their sexuality and bodies.”

Related:

An Open Letter to Piers Morgan, re: Feminism and the Women’s March
Amber Rose Posted a Nude Photo & Piers Morgan Had Something to Say
Emma Watson Isn’t a “Bad Feminist” for Baring Her Boobs

Subscribe to Our Newsletter
FLARE - Newsletter Signup

Get FLARE’s Need to Know newsletter for your daily dose of up-to-the-minute fashion, beauty, celebrity and news stories hand-picked by our editors—straight to your inbox. Sign up here.

Filed under:

Comments are closed.